Speech & Language Developmental Milestones

In the First Year of Life....

 

From Birth to Six Months

 

Expressive Language Skills

cries

makes sucking sounds and throaty voices

makes pleasure sounds

smiles

vowel sounds begin to emerge

coos, squeals, grunts

vocalizes and coos when talked to

Receptive Language Skills

startles to loud sounds

prefers human voice over non-human sounds

human voice has calming effect when crying

focuses on objects that are about 8 inches from her face

moves eyes in the direction of sound

differentiates male and female voices

follows the direction your eyes take when you move from looking at her to an object

pays attention to music

 
Baby's first smile occurs at four to six weeks; language development charts at Canto Speech Therapy Online
Babies coo, squeal and vocalize by six months; language development charts at Canto Speech Therapy
Baby in crib looking and listening; language development charts at Canto Speech Therapy Online
 

From Six to Twelve Months

 

Receptive Language Skills

vocalizations have purpose to request a person, an action or object and to comment on what's around them

shakes head "no"

repeats consonant-vowel combination - dadadada, pepepepe

babbling becomes more complex

consonant-vowel combination will have more sounds - adadatata, tetadagugu

babbling will have inflections

waves bye-bye

Receptive Language Skills

localizes sound

appears to be listening to conversation

plays pat-a-cake, peek-a-boo

responds to his own name

recognizes words for common objects: cup, milk

understands no

responds to simple requests

follows simple commands - Push the car.

recognizes names of family members

 
 
Baby responding to her name; language development charts at Canto Speech Therapy Online
 
Baby waves bye-bye by nine months; language development charts at Canto Speech Therapy Online

Interested in knowing what your child will be saying soon?  Check out the following charts to see how your child's speech and language will develop over the years!


If you’re just not sure that your child is on track, talk with your pediatrician who can refer you to a speech therapist. 

Or if you’d like to speak with one of our speech language pathologists, click Let’s Talk.

Remember not to wait too long to make sure your child is reaching the appropriate developmental milestones.

As time moves on, other children your chilld’s age will be progressing and that “gap” may get larger.

Help your child gain these important skills because

........the power of speech lasts a lifetime.